GSE Welcomes Three New Faculty Members

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The Graduate School of Education at Fordham University added three new members to its list of distinguished faculty this fall.

Dr. Philip Dituri

Dr. Philip Dituri

Dr. Philip Dituri
Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education
Division of Curriculum and Teaching

A native New Yorker, Dr. Dituri came to Fordham after spending 13 years in teaching math at a public high school on the Lower East Side. Prior to his teaching career, he did a short stint in finance and public relations. He received a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from Columbia University Teachers College in 2013, and was a 3-time master teacher for Math for America. He also helped author the Adolescence and Young Adulthood Mathematics Standards for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

As a consultant and instructional coach, Dr. Dituri also trains instructors of after-school programs how to run math circles to promote math extra-curricular activities for city youth for the Center for Mathematical Talent at New York University.

“I love math almost as a kind of philosophy. It teaches you to think, and it allows you to practice making clear argument,” said Dituri. “A big part of my job is helping people see why math is so fun and learn to love math…Math is just like everything else in life. The more you do it, the better you get at it.”

Dr. Dituri is a graduate of New York University with a bachelor’s degree in math. He is an avid fan of skateboarding, and enjoys running and dancing to electronic music. You can occasionally find him wrestling at a city recreation center on Pitt Street.

Dr. Jacqueline Gonzalez

Dr. Jacqueline Gonzalez

Dr. Jacqueline Bocachica Gonzalez
Clinical Assistant Professor
Division of Educational Leadership, Administration and Policy

After working for 32 years in the New York City Department of Education in various positions from classroom teacher and assistant principal to network leader and executive director of school quality in the central office, Dr. Gonzalez joined Fordham faculty after receiving an Ed.D. in Urban Leadership in the same division where she is teaching now.

A native of the Bronx, Dr. Gonzalez is a product of the New York public school system and a graduate of the prestigious Bronx High School of Science. A daughter of Puerto Rican parents, she came from a long line of educators in her family, including her mother, three aunts, her son and daughter-in-law. Her research interests include school improvement, leadership development and teacher support.

“All of my work has been focused around what do we do and how can we do it better in order to improve learning and teaching conditions for all schools,” said Gonzalez. “At the end of the day, it always boils down to what happens in the interaction between students, teachers and content in the classroom.”

Dr. Gonzalez holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Lehman College and a master’s degree in instructional technology from New York Institute of Technology. In her free time, she enjoys all kinds of music, especially Latin and jazz, and working in ministries serving children, women and others at the church she attends, the Sanctuary Fellowship, in the Bronx.

Dr. Shannon Waite

Dr. Shannon Waite

Dr. Shannon R. Waite
Clinical Assistant Professor
Division of Educational Leadership, Administration and Policy

Dr. Waite first joined Fordham as a NYC Teaching Fellow in 2003 and received a Master of Science in adolescence education in 2005. She taught social studies in public schools and subsequently worked as a dean of students, teacher recruitment manager, and human resources director. Before joining Fordham, she served as the director of recruitment for the principal pipeline leadership programs in the Office of Leadership in the New York City Department of Education. Her research interests include teacher diversity, the industrial prison complex, and the economic reality associated with the “pipeline to school” phenomenon.

“There IS research that shows we lose millions of dollars on students dropping out of school and not get their basic high school diploma,” said Waite. “For every African American student that dropped out, we as a nation lose a quarter of a million dollars in this person’s lifetime earning potential and tax revenues.”

A native of Highland Falls, New York, Dr. Waite holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and a master’s in public administration from the University at Albany (SUNY) as well as an Ed.D. in Executive Leadership at Fordham. A self-proclaimed “Dance Mom”, she enjoys her weekend activities with her family, including taking her two young daughters to dance lessons, visiting the zoo, and attending services at St. Luke Baptist Church.

This post was written by Larry Tung, a CLAIR doctoral student.

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